PDF ñ BOOK Midnight's Children FREE Ê SALMAN RUSHDIE


KINDLE Midnight's Children

PDF ñ BOOK Midnight's Children FREE Ê SALMAN RUSHDIE ½ [BOOKS] ⚡ Midnight's Children Author Salman Rushdie – Gwairsoft.co.uk Saleem Sinai was born at midnight the midnight of India's independence and found himself mysteriously handcuffed to history by the coincidence He is one of 1001 children born at theSaleem Sinai was born at midnight the midnight of India's independence and found himself mysteriously handcuffed to history by the coincidence He is one of 1001 children b Midnight's Children is not at all a fast read; it actually walks the line of being unpleasantly the opposite The prose is dense and initially frustrating in a way that seems almost deliberate with repeated instances of the narrator rambling ahead to a point that he feels is important but then before revealing anything of importance deciding that things ought to come in their proper order This use of digressions or better put uarter digressions can either be attributed to a charmingly distractable narrator or a vehicle for perhaps cheaply tantalizing the reader or bothI'll admit that at first I didn't appreciate being so persistently manipulated Many times in the first few chapters I found myself closing the book in anger thinking to myself If the story is worth it this tactic is utterly unnecessaryThe tactic it turns out is unnecessary The book the story is stunning It's stunning enough that the frustrating aspects of the telling are forgivable and actually retrospectively satisfying which I suspect is what the author wanted While the fractional digressions on the one hand can have you groping around for a lighter they on the other hand work to accustom you to the novel's epically meandering pace Also they effectively allow you to feel a certain urgency near the end of the book as the narrator runs out of timeThe imagery is lush; the characters are curiously magically lopsided; the language is complicated and beautiful; the chapters are nicely portioned despite the initial plodding pace; the narrative is deliberately allegorical which perhaps suggests an enhanced enjoyment of the work after studying a bit of Indian history Elements of the story's frame the narrator writing in a pickle factory with sweet Padma reading along are particularly amusing and the chapter entitled In the Sundarbans is nothing short of breathtakingThe book will go slow in the beginning; the book means to; give it patience it's worth it I think

Midnight's ChildrenSaleem Sinai was born at midnight the midnight of India's independence and found himself mysteriously handcuffed to history by the coincidence He is one of 1001 children b Midnight's Children is not at all a fast read; it actually walks the line of being unpleasantly the opposite The prose is dense and initially frustrating in a way that seems almost deliberate with repeated instances of the narrator rambling ahead to a point that he feels is important but then before revealing anything of importance deciding that things ought to come in their proper order This use of digressions or better put uarter digressions can either be attributed to a charmingly distractable narrator or a vehicle for perhaps cheaply tantalizing the reader or bothI'll admit that at first I didn't appreciate being so persistently manipulated Many times in the first few chapters I found myself closing the book in anger thinking to myself If the story is worth it this tactic is utterly unnecessaryThe tactic it turns out is unnecessary The book the story is stunning It's stunning enough that the frustrating aspects of the telling are forgivable and actually retrospectively satisfying which I suspect is what the author wanted While the fractional digressions on the one hand can have you groping around for a lighter they on the other hand work to accustom you to the novel's epically meandering pace Also they effectively allow you to feel a certain urgency near the end of the book as the narrator runs out of timeThe imagery is lush; the characters are curiously magically lopsided; the language is complicated and beautiful; the chapters are nicely portioned despite the initial plodding pace; the narrative is deliberately allegorical which perhaps suggests an enhanced enjoyment of the work after studying a bit of Indian history Elements of the story's frame the narrator writing in a pickle factory with sweet Padma reading along are particularly amusing and the chapter entitled In the Sundarbans is nothing short of breathtakingThe book will go slow in the beginning; the book means to; give it patience it's worth it I think

READER µ Midnight's Children ´ Salman Rushdie

Midnight's Children ¶ S gifts inner ear and wildly sensitive sense of smell we are drawn into a fascinating family saga set against the vast colourful background of the India of the 20th centur Reading Rushdie's Midnight's Children is like listening to someone else's long winded rambling re telling of a dream they had And like all people who describe their dreams especially those who do so long past the point where their listeners can believably fake interest or patience Rushdie is inherently selfish in the way he chose to write this book Midnight's Children is one of those novels that are reader neutral or even reader antagonistic they seem to have been written for the sole purpose of letting a writer wallow in their own history their own problems their own pet concerns desires and childhood hangups Books like this are not mirrors of the world or even mirrors of the author but mirrors of how the author wants to be seen by the worldThere are patches of writing in this book that startle amuse and tantalize the reader but the story is not as interesting as the narrator or the author seem to think it is; in fact the narrator's constant references to the depthdifficultycomplex interconnectedness of his story all rang false to me The narrator constantly tried to impress the reader with the gravity absurdity necessity etc of the story he was telling there were lots of annoying melodramatic asides to the reader along the lines of O this O that If only But I must wait to get to that later which only served to distract from a story that should have just been left to stand on its ownI'm not necessarily the type of reader who wants concrete literal plot driven stories but I'm also not the type of reader who has infinite patience for postmodern self inflated authors who either have a degree in literature and waste no time bludgeoning you with that fact or don't have a degree in literature and waste no time in showing you just how good they are despite it all And lastly above and beyond the annoying narrator the rambling story that went on for about 200 too many pages and the author's disrespect or at least disregard for the reader the last and crushing blow I can deliver to this book is that it was boring The narrator – who by the way is a fairly flat character despite having over 500 pages to develop himself went to great pains to convince us otherwise with constant reminders of how epic and interconnected his life was and how it resonated with the history of modern India but in my opinion a truly interesting story wouldn't need an obseuious narrator to constantly remind us how interesting it was I realize I'm in a minority in my dislike of this book; after all it won the Booker Prize and is widely regarded to be one of the most important novels in English language literature I also realize I haven't said anything about what the book is actually about in a nutshell a coming of age story with a heavy dollop of magical realism and self pity with doses of Indian life scattered throughout but all I felt when turning the last page of this book was relief READER µ Midnight's Children ´ Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie ´ Midnight's Children READER

Salman Rushdie ´ Midnight's Children READER Orn at the midnight hour each of them endowed with an extraordinary talent and whose privilege and curse it is to be both master and victims of their times Through Saleem' The power of the storytelling left me speechless all the words were in the novel and there were none left for me If there ever was a novel that changed the way I read this is it I must have read each sentence several times just to follow the thread of the confusing story and I still got lost in the labyrinth of individual and collective history that unfolds on the stroke of Midnight on the night of India's independence So completely taken in by the children who are born on that particular stroke of midnight thus beginning their lives together with the state I must have bought at least ten copies of it over the course of the years to give to relatives and friends in different parts of the world It was not always a welcome present and some people looked at me strangely after giving up on reading it They seemed to have come to the conclusion that my mind must be as confused as the novel if I was infatuated with it to the degree that I began to ramble when I talked about itBut it is just such a perfect example of how literature transcends reality and stays true at the same time It is deeply connected to its roots in post colonial India and yet universal in its idea of humanityAre we really who we think we are? Does it even matter if we are who we think we are or is it important that we are what we are meant to be? What decides what we are meant to be then? The sum total of what came before us and led to our being born constitutes the stage which we enter Then we act out the play which is co written by humanity and it is definitely a tragedy for we all owe death a life which is what tragedy is all about life leading to death Whatever happens to us has the effect of a deus ex machina and sometimes there are gods in machines than we can handle keep track of or even describe in a novel Sometimes the gods get stuck in their machines as well Anything is possible on the stage of life And it is always opening night first performance debut We forget our lines and we ramble In life and in art In this novel we stumble over words spoken too fast as if the characters are afraid that the curtain will fall before they have had their fair share of the showHow come it is so hopelessly funny then this tragedy of India? How come each story line makes me smile through tears?In my memory the novel grows to an explosion of the senses I hear a cacophony of voices chatting incoherently in my head I see colours merge into fireworks of lametta I feel the heat and cold and humidity and dryness of an India I have never been to I taste the foods whose names I cannot pronounce I touch and I am touched by the story which contains a truth deeper than reality It is funny in the exhilarating way a roller coaster is funny You slowly move upwards seeing where you are heading feeling your stomach react to the fall before it comes hoping for it to end and to go on forever You feel dizzy and brave and alive but confusedDo I remember the plot correctly? Well memory itself is a tricky oneMemory's truth because memory has its own special kind It selects eliminates alters exaggerates minimizes glorifies and vilifies also; but in the end it creates its own reality its heterogeneous but usually coherent version of events; and no sane human being ever trusts someone else's version than his ownSo I trust my own memory and declare that what I remember is true This is a masterpiece It was written in 1981 Where's that Nobel? Stuck in a broken god machine? Nothing to be surprised at there the novel is about how such things happen