Buzz Sting Bite Summary ´ E-book or Kindle E-pub


Summary Buzz Sting Bite

Buzz Sting Bite Summary ´ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ↠ ➳ [Reading] ➶ Buzz Sting Bite By Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson ➩ – Gwairsoft.co.uk An enthusiastic witty and informative introduction to the world of insects and why we—and the planet we inhabit—could not survive without themInsects comprise roughly half oDead plants and animals into soil They pollinate flowers including crops that we depend on They provide food for other animals such as birds and bats They control organisms that are harmful to humans Life as we know it depends on these small creaturesWith ecologist Anne Sverdrup Thygeson as our capable entertaining guide into the insect world we’ll learn that there is variety among insects than we can even imagine and the you learn about insects the fascinating they become Buzz Sting Bite is an essential introduction to the little creatures that make the world go roun. 35 stars

Buzz Sting BiteDead plants and animals into soil They pollinate flowers including crops that we depend on They provide food for other animals such as birds and bats They control organisms that are harmful to humans Life as we know it depends on these small creaturesWith ecologist Anne Sverdrup Thygeson as our capable entertaining guide into the insect world we’ll learn that there is variety among insects than we can even imagine and the you learn about insects the fascinating they become Buzz Sting Bite is an essential introduction to the little creatures that make the world go roun. 35 stars

review ✓ E-book, or Kindle E-pub Ò Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson

Buzz Sting Bite Á Of us know that we would not have honey without honeybees but without the pinhead sized chocolate midge cocoa flowers would not pollinate No cocoa no chocolate The ink that was used to write the Declaration of Independence was derived from galls on oak trees which are induced by a small wasp The fruit fly was essential to medical and biological research experiments that resulted in six Nobel prizes Blowfly larva can clean difficult wounds flour beetle larva can digest plastic several species of insects have been essential to the development of antibiotics Insects turn. 45 stars for this fascinating book about the wonders of the insect kingdom This is a book to savour rather than to read straight through packed as it is with tiny snapshots into the amazing diversity of insect life The author's enthusiasm for creepy crawlies is infectious and I ended the book with a new appreciation for insects and the many ways they support and improve life including human life on earth review ✓ E-book, or Kindle E-pub Ò Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson

Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson Ò 9 Read

Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson Ò 9 Read An enthusiastic witty and informative introduction to the world of insects and why we and the planet we inhabit could not survive without themInsects comprise roughly half of the animal kingdom They live everywhere deep inside caves feet high in the Himalayas inside computers in Yellowstone’s hot springs and in the ears and nostrils of much larger creatures There are insects that have ears on their knees eyes on their penises and Buzz Sting Epubtongues under their feet Most of us think life would be better without bugs In fact life would be impossible without themMost. I find insects peripheral to my life a bit icky and preferably to be avoided where possible – except for bees of course because we all love bees I was therefore surprised to find myself attracted to this book primarily because the cover photograph of an iridescent beetle was stunning I imagined it to be a slim A4 sized book with lots of attractive pictures and with little snips of information dotted around the edge of each page to augment the pix I can't tell you how my heart dropped when it landed on my Kindle and I found out it was a proper 'read your way through this mate' book with a mere sprinkling of black and white illustrations A proper book all about insects Three hundred and eleven pages EeeekIn fact it turned out to be a brilliant read Anne Sverdrup Thygeson is a wonderful writer as well as being hugely knowledgeable in her field For instance who knew that we owe fruit flies so much They are the perfect creature for laboratory study – cheap and easy to keep with 77% of disease related gene seuences being found both in human and fruit flies They have taught us a ton about chromosomes and ways that traits are transmitted They have also helped with research into cancer Parkinson's insomnia jet lag and alcoholism It's amazing that such a humble creature has been able to help us so muchComing hot on their heels as another possible human benefactor are blow fly maggots As we have increasing problems with finding antibiotics that work we may well return to methods used by Genghis Kahn then later in the Napoleonic Wars and even in World War 1 – maggots They are great at cleaning up wounds without damaging any healthy flesh that may be present They are already used in some instances where healing is proving particularly difficult and are bred in sterile laboratories for that purpose What about ordinary houseflies you may ask Well they're pretty amazing too They taste with their feet Not only that but they are one hundred times sensitive to sugar than we are with our tongues Insect anatomies are really mind boggling in various respects They have ears but not on their heads they don't have lungs but breathe through holes in their bodies Their blood called haemolymph carries nutrition and hormones but no oxygen so it isn't red instead it is yellow colourless or green It turns out that a lot about insect bodies is weird and pleasantly excitingRather romantically Sverdrup Thygeson talks about a dress that was woven from spider thread view spoiler“Spider silk on a per weight basis it is 6 times stronger than steel and also very elastic You could harvest 100 metres of silk from one spider – but we can't breed spiders like silkworms because they eat one another However a beautiful golden dress was woven from silk spun by golden orb spiders from Madagascar broke records for visitor numbers when exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London in 2012 It took four years to make Every morning 80 workers collected new spiders They were hooked up to a small hand operated machine where they were 'milked' of their silk then released again in the evening In all 12 million spiders were needed “ hide spoiler