Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman Republic epub ´ Paperback read ê tom holland


text Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman Republic

Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman Republic epub ´ Paperback read ê tom holland ¿ ✻ [BOOKS] ✯ Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman Republic By Tom Holland ❅ – Gwairsoft.co.uk In 49 BC the seven hundred fifth year since the founding of Rome Julius Caesar crossedThe twilight of the Republic and its bloody transformation into an empire From Cicero Spartacus and Brutus to Cleopatra Virgil and Augustus here are some of the most legendary figures in history brought thrillingly to life Combining verve and freshness with scrupulous scholarship It is rare that you come across a history book which is suitable for both readers who know a fair amount about the subject and also for those who know virtually nothing but this is one of those very unusual books To be fair most people know something about the Roman Empire but this book fleshes out historical characters that may be just ‘names’ and puts them in context The book begins with Julius Caesar about to take the supreme gamble of ‘Crossing the Rubicon’ and then backtracks to show the reader why that was such an immense step to take There is much about the establishment of the Republic as far back as 509 BC before explaining the importance of the Republic to Romans As Cicero once stated “The fruit of too much liberty is slavery” and so as the book unfolds we hear of how the almost religious sense of community felt by Roman citizens and of politics and power in the history of RomeThis book is full of famous names and events Civil wars assassinations ancient patrician families prestige and politics abound As the book progresses we read of Sulla Marius Pompey and Crassus Much of the bulk of the book tells the story of Julius Caesar – the young man of nineteen who was forced to flee Rome and who then stood on the threshold of history on the Rubicon Cleopatra Antony and Octavian all exist here in a readable and understandable form In fact the author cleverly uses modern titles and sub titles to help us understand the context of events – so you read “The Winner Takes it All” “Luck Be a Lady” or “Blitzkrieg” and know exactly where the author is expertly leading us“Rubicon” covers a vast time period and a huge cast of characters We travel from the establishment of the Republic in 509 BC to the death of Augustus in 14 AD and as such sometimes there is a lack of depth However as an introductory read it would be hard to beat this When Octavian faced Antony and won it was clear how the Citizens of Rome were grateful for peace and a restored Republic Understanding the Roman people – and the importance of re branding – Octavian became Augustus and held power for forty years I look forward to “Dynasty” Tom Holland’s seuel to “Rubicon” and his history of Rome’s first imperial dynasty If it is anything near as readable and enjoyable as this then it will be a great read

Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman RepublicThe twilight of the Republic and its bloody transformation into an empire From Cicero Spartacus and Brutus to Cleopatra Virgil and Augustus here are some of the most legendary figures in history brought thrillingly to life Combining verve and freshness with scrupulous scholarship It is rare that you come across a history book which is suitable for both readers who know a fair amount about the subject and also for those who know virtually nothing but this is one of those very unusual books To be fair most people know something about the Roman Empire but this book fleshes out historical characters that may be just ‘names’ and puts them in context The book begins with Julius Caesar about to take the supreme gamble of ‘Crossing the Rubicon’ and then backtracks to show the reader why that was such an immense step to take There is much about the establishment of the Republic as far back as 509 BC before explaining the importance of the Republic to Romans As Cicero once stated “The fruit of too much liberty is slavery” and so as the book unfolds we hear of how the almost religious sense of community felt by Roman citizens and of politics and power in the history of RomeThis book is full of famous names and events Civil wars assassinations ancient patrician families prestige and politics abound As the book progresses we read of Sulla Marius Pompey and Crassus Much of the bulk of the book tells the story of Julius Caesar – the young man of nineteen who was forced to flee Rome and who then stood on the threshold of history on the Rubicon Cleopatra Antony and Octavian all exist here in a readable and understandable form In fact the author cleverly uses modern titles and sub titles to help us understand the context of events – so you read “The Winner Takes it All” “Luck Be a Lady” or “Blitzkrieg” and know exactly where the author is expertly leading us“Rubicon” covers a vast time period and a huge cast of characters We travel from the establishment of the Republic in 509 BC to the death of Augustus in 14 AD and as such sometimes there is a lack of depth However as an introductory read it would be hard to beat this When Octavian faced Antony and won it was clear how the Citizens of Rome were grateful for peace and a restored Republic Understanding the Roman people – and the importance of re branding – Octavian became Augustus and held power for forty years I look forward to “Dynasty” Tom Holland’s seuel to “Rubicon” and his history of Rome’s first imperial dynasty If it is anything near as readable and enjoyable as this then it will be a great read

ebook Ï Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman Republic ä Tom Holland

Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman Republic ¾ In Last Years PDFEPUB #234 BC the seven hundred fifth year since the founding of Rome Julius Caesar crossed a small border river called the Rubicon and plunged Rome into cataclysmic civil war Tom Holland’s enthralling account tells the story of Caesar’s generation witness to I know this books wasn't really meant to be read by someone with a classics background but would it have killed Holland to write a popularized history with a bit recent historical research in it I will commend him and nearly give him a 3 for presenting the republican romans as the superstitious and religiously conscious lot they were but that is pretty much ok and the raunchy details they would have left out where this book diverges from something that could have been written in the 50s For example the patron client model essentially institutionalized mafia social dynamics explains a lot about why the different personalities acted the way they did in the waning years of the republic and is widely accepted and understood amongst historians of antiuity but Holland barely goes into it And it could have made the romans so much easier to understand Instead he went the familiar route modernizing roman sensibilities and institutions even starting the book with a brief comparison to the modern US This is of course nonsense The people living in antiuity had a world view and understanding of their place in the universe and society VERY different from ours The job of the popular historian is not to make them appear as modern people in the old tired vein of 18th 19th century historeography but make us understand them even as they confuse us in their decicions and archaeic worldview In Millenium he makes this very same error on the other side of the scaleI guess it is a good thing that he gets people into history he is a very good writer But those points just grind my perception of this book down ebook Ï Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman Republic ä Tom Holland

Tom Holland ä Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman Republic kindle

Tom Holland ä Rubicon The Last Years of the Roman Republic kindle Rubicon Rubicon The Kindle is not only an engrossing history of this pivotal era but a uniuely resonant portrait of a great civilization in all The Last Years of the Epubits extremes of self sacrifice and rivalry decadence and catastrophe intrigue war and world shaking ambitio Breezy and brisk Tom Holland tells the story of the early Roman Republic and the counterintuitive yet inevitable transition to a monarchy in a style that is very easy to read The Roman Republic was founded upon an abhorrence of kings making the presumption that Rome was destined to be ruled by emperors somewhat hard to swallow Holland however makes the case for Roman personal ambition and competetiveness as major motivators for kingship and also highlights a variety of additional interesting oxymorons built into Roman dogmaThe speed with which the reader is whooshed through the narrative makes one worry how thorough a history can be without being stodgy and meticulous Carthage the Punic Wars and Hannibal receive perhaps two pages One gets the impression as they read this book that they are zipping through an art museum on a roller coasterGladly the details Holland chooses are chosen very well which makes his accelerated style very functional They are concise and illuminating and well crafted and they make it possible to describe the Carthaginian wars effectivelyThe Roman attitude is the primary theme with all its perks and pitfalls For example Romans regarded their city with pride and arrogance yet Holland and others compare it unfavorably to other cities of its day in terms of layout consistency and architectural beauty The anathema of long term despotic rule does have its advantages as Holland indicates allowing long term architectural projects and metropolitan organization compared to 1 year consular rule that prevented extensive plans of action resulting in a Rome that was in short a haphazard dump in which it was easy to get lost Romans likewise cherished the illusion of public opinion swaying the direction of their city and nation when in truth the ruling class held sway and as years passed as the Republic gradually metamorphosed into a plutocracyBecause this period of Roman history has been covered to great extent it's difficult to uestion the veracity of historical fact Holland presents he offers up seven pages of source material in defense of his writings Holland has degrees in English and Latin not history and may take a bit of creative license with the figures in his book but he doesn't spend much time on anyone without a significant amount of contemporary writing done about them and it's easy to infer what sort of men Julius and Augustus Caesar Pompey Sulla Cicero and others were through their actions and because they constantly wrote about themselves or had someone else do it for them though they may have elaborated somewhat upon their histories it's plausible that Julius Caesar was not in fact a god While the opinions and feelings he projects upon the characters may or may not be true the circumstances certainly were and Holland uses his Roman Thesis to calculate them appropriatelyIn the end Holland covers ground similar to that which Plutarch covers with the latter Roman portion of his Lives but with energy and a great deal of circumspection about the nature of Roman society with the aforementioned disdain for an inevitable monarchy at the forefront and how successive personalities laid the path for EmperorsI liked this book a great deal